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Worksheet Wednesday

Worksheet Wednesday: Passive Voice with Ratatouille

ratatouilleEveryone loves the Disney/Pixar movie Ratatouille, right? Who wouldn’t want to follow the adventures of a precocious rat running around a Michelin star restaurant?

Inspired by an exercise on the always-useful Movie Segments to Assess Grammar Goals blog, I made these pages for my Intermediate level classes to accompany a short clip from the popular film. The objective is to get the students more comfortable with passive voice. In this lesson, I assume the students have already been introduced to the grammar structure. A typical ~45 minute lesson plan exploiting this worksheet would go something like this:

Warm-up: small group/partner discussion – Do you like to cook? What can you cook by yourself? etc  Or questions about dining out, like “What’s the fanciest restaurant you’ve been to?” or the like. “What would you do if you saw a mouse or rat in a restaurant?”
Then ask if they’ve seen Ratatouille. You can show the poster of the movie or a still from it to jog their memory. See if they can summarize the film or give a rough outline of its plot.

Watch the clip. It’s 3 minutes long. You can download the clip here. You can have them take notes on part A of the worksheet if you like.

Have the students recount what happened in the clip. Make sure they know who the three characters are (Remy, Colete, and Linguini). Some concept check questions will help make sure they can do the rest of the exercises.

Then, you can have them do either exercise B or C, depending on whether they’ve had an introduction to passive voice already or not. If not, starting with part C might be better, with some instruction on how to form the passive voice first. If they have, then B can be enough, with C as some extra practice for reinforcement.

A wrap-up discussion can be done next, with similar questions from the warm-up, but guide them to use passive voice. You can give them a topic like “Describe the last time you ate out.” and model an example with passive voice. “My friends and I went to Tony’s Italian. Spaghetti was served. The dish was prepared without cheese. … ” Concept check questions using passive voice can be used to steer them in the right direction.

There you have it. Let me know if you use this, and tell me how it goes!

Download the worksheet and answer key:

passive voice – ratatouille

passive voice – ratatouille AK

Ratatouille video clip

 

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Worksheet Wednesday: Station Learning!

For this week’s worksheet, it’s a 4-nanza! Have you ever tried any station learning worksheetactivities in your ESL class? They’re a classic tool for young learners in native language classes, but they can be an excellent way to liven up your older-learner ESL classroom as well. In the university prep program where I teach, I’ve used stations in my classes for the past 4 modules, and they’ve mostly been very well received. (The first time I did it, I didn’t really explain it to the students that well, so they were a tad bit confused. Oops!)

So, for this week’s Worksheet Wednesday, I’ve included the 4 pages you would need to run this station learning activity. It’s an elementary level review activity, with a reading passage, adjectives of emotion, simple sentences, and error correction. I’m sharing these with you more to give you some ideas, not necessarily for you to use them directly, though you are completely welcome to if they meet your needs. If you do use them, you’ll need to do some cutting for each station. And since these are provided as examples, I didn’t make an answer sheet and the instructions are very light. Caveat emptor.

Station 1: simple sentences stations – station 1
Station 2: simple sentences stations – station 2
Station 3: simple sentences stations – station 3
Station 4: simple sentences stations – station 4

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These worksheets are considered Creative Commons licensed; you can modify use them if you want in your classroom. If you redistribute them, though, we would like to be acknowledged, and don’t even think about selling them! It would be awesome of you to let us know if you use any of our worksheets, and if you see any mistakes or have any suggestions, please let me know!

Worksheet Wednesday: Modals of Probability

worksheetEvery Wednesday, we share a worksheet with you to use as you see fit. These worksheets are considered Creative Commons licensed; you can modify use them if you want in your classroom. If you redistribute them, though, we would like to be acknowledged, and don’t even think about selling them! It would be awesome of you to let us know if you use any of our worksheets, and if you see any mistakes or have any suggestions, please let me know!

This week, we have a worksheet on modals of probability. This go-around, the answer key is separate; you’re welcome.

modals of probability

modals of probability AK

Worksheet Wednesday: Stative & Dynamic Verbs

worksheetEvery Wednesday, we share a worksheet with you to use as you see fit. These worksheets are considered Creative Commons licensed; you can modify use them if you want in your classroom. If you redistribute them, though, we would like to be acknowledged, and don’t even think about selling them! It would be awesome of you to let us know if you use any of our worksheets, and if you see any mistakes or have any suggestions, please let me know!

This week, we’re sharing one we used last module in our Intermediate class while studying stative and dynamic verbs. If you aren’t super familiar with this topic, you can learn more about it here and see a list of stative verbs here. Or just, you know, Google it.

Without further ado, stative and dynamic verbs practice. Please note there is an answer key on the last page. Don’t print that when you pass these out to your students!

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