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Worksheet Wednesday: Passive Voice with Ratatouille

ratatouilleEveryone loves the Disney/Pixar movie Ratatouille, right? Who wouldn’t want to follow the adventures of a precocious rat running around a Michelin star restaurant?

Inspired by an exercise on the always-useful Movie Segments to Assess Grammar Goals blog, I made these pages for my Intermediate level classes to accompany a short clip from the popular film. The objective is to get the students more comfortable with passive voice. In this lesson, I assume the students have already been introduced to the grammar structure. A typical ~45 minute lesson plan exploiting this worksheet would go something like this:

Warm-up: small group/partner discussion – Do you like to cook? What can you cook by yourself? etc  Or questions about dining out, like “What’s the fanciest restaurant you’ve been to?” or the like. “What would you do if you saw a mouse or rat in a restaurant?”
Then ask if they’ve seen Ratatouille. You can show the poster of the movie or a still from it to jog their memory. See if they can summarize the film or give a rough outline of its plot.

Watch the clip. It’s 3 minutes long. You can download the clip here. You can have them take notes on part A of the worksheet if you like.

Have the students recount what happened in the clip. Make sure they know who the three characters are (Remy, Colete, and Linguini). Some concept check questions will help make sure they can do the rest of the exercises.

Then, you can have them do either exercise B or C, depending on whether they’ve had an introduction to passive voice already or not. If not, starting with part C might be better, with some instruction on how to form the passive voice first. If they have, then B can be enough, with C as some extra practice for reinforcement.

A wrap-up discussion can be done next, with similar questions from the warm-up, but guide them to use passive voice. You can give them a topic like “Describe the last time you ate out.” and model an example with passive voice. “My friends and I went to Tony’s Italian. Spaghetti was served. The dish was prepared without cheese. … ” Concept check questions using passive voice can be used to steer them in the right direction.

There you have it. Let me know if you use this, and tell me how it goes!

Download the worksheet and answer key:

passive voice – ratatouille

passive voice – ratatouille AK

Ratatouille video clip

 

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Bookmark This! #2

Here are a few more useful links for teachers. Get those bookmarking fingers ready.

  1. Triptico
    This site features a bunch of cool tools and games that work well in the classroom. A lot of them are ‘Premium’ now, which sucks, because many of them are great. Still, there are useful freebies. My personal favorite in the hourglass timer.
    triptico01
  2.  Teaching with Songs
    Songs are great; they liven up class and students really enjoy them. There’s a lot you can do with them, from vocabulary to grammar to a variety of skills. Thanks to the YouTube and lyrics sites, it’s easier than ever to use songs in your lessons. This site can help you find the right song and some exercises to go with them. And there are tons of recent pop songs.
  3. Movie Segments to Assess Grammar Goals
    This site is an excellent site. There are dozens of video from popular movies associated with different grammar topics. The activities aren’t always perfect, but they’re often a good place to start.
  4. TV Subtitles
    Songs aren’t the only way to make class more fun. TV shows can be another great resource of authentic language, and they’re inherently more interesting than the average coursebook. The trouble is, for ESL students whose listening skills aren’t developed enough, understanding the dialogue can be challenging. With this site, you can find subtitles for most recent TV shows.
  5. Padlet
    padletThis site is great. You create a new padlet page and share the url with your students. They can then add comments, questions, links, or the like and everyone will see them on the page. They can do it anonymously if they want. This can be a very useful way for students to ask questions or offer comments without having to raise their hands or speak in front of their classmates.

The Singular “They”

Down with the generic ‘he’. Down with ‘he or she’ and ‘s/he’. Long live the singular ‘they’! This change cannot become standard soon enough. I mean, we use the singular ‘you’ for the plural as well, so what’s the issue, eh?

NPR agrees.

899580-they_logo

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